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Mustache Maniacs Film Co. Wiki

Remember the Alamo is an animated short film briefly covering the Battle of the Alamo. It was originally created in 2005, but the project was shelved, then eventually forgotten. It was not until 2013 that the footage was rediscovered, then compiled as part of the From the Vaults collection. Some live action scenes were also part of this film, but they were not recovered.


Plot Summary

2016-11-16 17-38-56.239.jpg

"Stop it! Stop it! You're ruining everything!"
-Theodore Taylor, Mustache Maniacs Film Co. is Coming to LEGO Dimensions!
Spoiler warning! This section contains details that reveal crucial plot points. If you do not want to find out what happens, skip to the next section.

The film briefly covers the highlights of the Battle of the Alamo. The film begins with some cannon fire, then shows a messenger arrive at the Alamo, who is welcomed in. From there, the Mexican Army tries to scale the walls of the fort, but is pushed back. The messenger then leaves amidst the gunfire from the Mexican Army.

The Mexican Army pushes forward again, this time breaking through the fort's walls. The men defending the fort are slaughtered, but the women and children are allowed to leave. The film ends with the famous moment when the line is drawn in the sand.

Production History

Around the same time The Roulette Match was created (early 2005), this short film was also made. At that time, an entire wild west set was built for creating animated films, and a fort was part of it. With some slight redecorating, the fort became the Alamo, ready to be filmed at every angle and to be destroyed when the Mexican Army pushes through. In the original cut, the animation was only a portion of the film, with most of it being live action dialogue scenes.

However, right after Indiana Jones and the Heart of the Dragon was released, all other projects being developed at the time, including this film, were put on hold. At this time, there was a period of stagnation when the then-named Daniel and Andrew Film Co. did not release any films (the name change and the Cornerstone Thespian Society were among the causes for this). During this period, development focused instead on other projects, like Com 50-3: Raid on Central Island and Johnny Thunder and the Secret of Marco Polo. By the time the period ended, this film was long forgotten.

In 2013, during the Old LEGO Studios Film Hunt, all of the animation for this film was discovered on an archival CD, allowing the animated portion of this film to return. The From the Vaults release officially debuted on February 23, 2013.

Audience Reception

Not many people watched the film, but those that did were curious about the production history. One question by Push Over Productions was answered in an edition of Ask Mark Matthew.

Mistakes

  • Visual Error: When a wagon leaves the Alamo and heads off into the desert, the horse and wagon disappear after they make contact with the backdrop.
  • Visual Error: In the final shot, the lighting drastically changes partway through.

Credits

Tropes

2016-11-16 17-38-56.239.jpg

"Stop it! Stop it! You're ruining everything!"
-Theodore Taylor, Mustache Maniacs Film Co. is Coming to LEGO Dimensions!
Spoiler warning! This section contains details that reveal crucial plot points. If you do not want to find out what happens, skip to the next section.

Remember the Alamo contains examples of the following tropes.

  • Artistic License: In relation to architecture, the Alamo in this film is extremely inaccurate to the real-life building, and that's not even counting the "replica's" psychedelia color scheme. It actually looks more like the LEGO set Fort Legorado than the actual Alamo.
  • Battle Epic: This film is an animated recreation of the Battle of the Alamo.
  • Dramatization: The film is very patchwork-y since only the animation was recovered, but the events depicted are fairly accurate to the actual Battle of the Alamo.
  • Off-the-Shelf FX: Literally EVERYTHING in this film was either recycled from an existing wild west set or was obtained from a Mexican-American War playset. The latter source was especially useful in bulking up the number of troops in the film.

Trivia

  • This film was partially inspired by a visit to the actual Alamo in San Antonio, Texas.
  • This is Mustache Maniacs Film Co.'s first film to use true animation.
  • All of the events that happen in the film are modeled after actual events in the Battle of the Alamo; nothing was invented for the film.

Gallery

External Links

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